xx

28/11/2013:

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Last night rehearsing Red Velvet rehearsal – plenty of music, plenty of wine – hence the blurry shot of Deirdre and Les!

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back home after week of rambling

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Busking spot, Upper Street, Islington, last Saturday

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As I was heading up Upper Street I couldn’t resist making a little one-man Greenpeace protest outside the Shell garage

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Gareth, Winter Busker, Cambridge

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Pirate Jack, Winter Busker, Cambridge

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Pican Pie – following Thanksgiving Jamboree organised by my Mystic Lady American friend, Pam, last Saturday

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Naomi and Keith of  Imperial Guitars at the TEXAS Corn Exchange gig having sold a 1963 Silvertone to guitarist Ally…who played it in the gig.

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TEXAS at the Corn Exchange, Cambridge 25/11/2013

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24/11/2013

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‘I am Ondine, I am Ondine

I never say where I have been’

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>
>
> Sing from heart, Sylvie, and be true to yourself.

These pics added 14/11/13:

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Camden yesterday afternoon

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Regent’s Canal heading West

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Zoo

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the ‘H’ Ladbroke Grove

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Notting Hill sunset

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Notting Hill dawn

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early roll

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green tea with jasmine

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le petit dejuner

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6/11/2013

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River Cam headwaters, last Thursday

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Roman Road to Cambridge

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this road-killed owl was still warm – removed some wing feathers as homage

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taking the B road roundabout route to Cambridge found this, the loneliest park bench?

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Into the woods on Halloween

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then to the Duke of Beaconsfield on Mill Road in Cambridge for Wednesday evening traditional Irish session

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game of chess with Alex at Wintercomfort

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26/10/2014

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Flittick with Becky the gorgeous life force last Saturday

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Ed’s pad where I crashed for the night

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Confession: when in Brighton I pay for 99p ice creams with small busking change – my office

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delicious blackberries on the road to Cambridge – surprisingly late

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bitter little apples

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Ireland, England!

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another rare country sight

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Sometimes I sing to myself as I cycle – it’s a good way of learning songs. I was running through Dylan’s great outlaw ballad ‘Billy’ when I saw the Hacienda sign. Serendipity.

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take-away coffee in the rain

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back to Cambridge – I was an undergraduate here, Corpus Christi College, from 1981-1984 – English Tripos and plenty of unofficial theatre-making, based at the Corpus Playroom

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On Tuesday mornings, when in Cambridge, I volunteer with washing-up and ‘art’. That’s Wendy who runs the Wintercomfort kitchen with great skill and imagination. Front-line homeless charity.

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I’ve been painting my Martin ukelele case

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6/10/2012

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busking Brighton this gorgeous afternoon with very talented local singer-songwriter, Bea Everett, age 19 – we did ok mixing original material with 2/3 chord standards from the raw american folk-country-blues tradition – Bea reckons she’ll be digging deep into that fine line – for me those songs are like handshakes with musical strangers! Great session Bea – and great to have boyfriend ‘Skinny’ strumming along on the uke once we’d hit our groove.

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Must be love beacuse Bea’s lost her apertite – just wants to play all day and go to the beach. Bea’s voice is heaven-sent.

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Late morning before the busking session I found the wondeful Garden Pavillion Cafe. Dave the owner and Chrissie serving with a smile. Dave is campaigning hard to keep this 72 year old family business going following Council plans to destroy it for weird reasons. Leave it alone – it’s a great hang-out. Caroline Lucas is a regular Dave tells me and wants to keep it despite Green controlled Council’s bizarre notion that they have better ideas.

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Before enjoying a cup of coffee for £1.60 at the Garden Pavillion cafe, Banjo Nick scubbed up squeaky clean in these beachfront public facilities.

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Sunday morning in Brighton! hang-over city.

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Brighton seafront brekkie – not bad for less than a fiver minus coffee, hit the spot anyway around 8 am

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Banjo Nick on the road to bright lights of Brighton

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My view first thing this morning after clear starry night featuring my mystical cosmic connection Orion’s Belt showing clear as crystals to the sound of the ocean’s swell and swish – I almost went out-of-body, guys! Clear sea air too. What could be more perfect?

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My resting place last night.

20/8/2013

Caroline can sing! I believe the police were ill-advised to manhandle her son in such a thuggush manner yesterday at Balcolme. I hope all is well with all of the protestors placed under forced arrest.

I admired James Naughtie’s used of the word ‘proxy’ in the pre-8am BBC news ‘Today’ interview with Caroline. If fracking results in the contamination of ground water (*or surface water) then that is sufficient to close it down. The astonishing Thames turnaround from ‘dead’ river in the sixties would not have been possible without the universal disgust at preventable pollution – partly, I believe, generated by the Queens’s youthful observations to Winston Churchill on the matter. Long before the words ‘climate’ and ‘change’ were so illiterately hyhernated. Climate is always changing, always has been and always will be. Caroline’s point is that it is going to change for the worse (from the human perspective) very soon unless we make a concerted effort to overcome our dreadful dependency on fossil fuels and war. This is a clean water issue.

19/08/2013
  1. Telegraph.co.uk ‎- 8 minutes ago
    Caroline Lucas, the Green MP, was arrested as she took part in an anti-fracking demonstration in Balcombe
17/08/13
Sent: Saturday, 17 August 2013, 15:06 Subject: BBC Complaints: ‘dash for gas’ ng Ref: TO2013/14776

Glenda Jackson is on holiday
Caroline
‘fracking poisons water’ i prefer
‘dash for gas’ is deeply problematic for it serves to appeal to the very worst instincts of the mass short-termism championed by Cameron and his Eton College power-base and interdependently by Rupert Murdoch.
Even Juniper seems to have bought into it – ‘climate change’ is a very big picture — the willful contamination of the world’s most precious resource, WATER, is always a microsopically local one. Herein lies the destructive paradox afflicted the UK Green Party – made so much more critical, as a destructive force, given your structural links with the Labour Party types and Trade Unions – organisations with zero green responsibilty regarding another big picture – the UK’s morally reprehensible stake in the international arms trade.
The single most powerful thing Ed Miliband can do, Joan, is to defend our ground water from fracking contamination.
Does HRH Prince Charles like this as I do?
rule number one: impeccable treatment of the wise and infirm
most honoured in Richmond Z (Bill Colley on dusty banjo, a strummer) but forget it Hammersmith the goer
to Donald, the perfect Bohemian?
Sent: Thursday, 15 August 2013, 18:15 Subject: Dear Donald
2 Robert Jennings Close
Cambridge CB4 1YT
15th August 2013
Dear Donald
I was absolutely delighted to open the envelope and see that view so beautifully painted by Terry McKivagan. How many hours have I spent sculling that stretch? How many spent river-gazing from Lower Mall? I cannot say.
Thank you so much for the invitation to drink/lunch with you – I can think of nothing I would rather do… maintenance is with an ‘a’. I will call you in the next few days to arrange a good time – with plenty of time to talk.
Warm regards
Nick Ward
How is the new play coming along?
11
sculling the Cam in 2009  photo by my dad
Champerty and maintenance are doctrines in common law jurisdictions, that aim to preclude frivolous litigation. “Maintenance” is the intermeddling of a disinterested party to encourage a lawsuit.[1] It is “A taking in hand, a bearing up or upholding of quarrels or sides, to the disturbance of the common right.”[2] “Champerty” is the “maintenance” of a person in a lawsuit on condition that the subject matter of the action is to be shared with the maintainer.[3] Among laypersons, this is known as “buying into someone else’s lawsuit.”
12/8/2013
photo(1)
photo(2)
photo(3)
‘Fruit 2009’ – a gift to my god-daughter, Ella
photo(5)
‘Maban 2011’ – sold to Chris Simon
perhaps ‘maban’ and ‘fruit’ are impossible to choose between – perhaps they are a dialectical pair despite ownership complications! I never imagined them togther but they reallty do compliment each other – male and female principles?
IMG_1220
Barcelona 3D piece by Ella (2013)
That’s also what I see conjoined in your extraordinary 3D work in Barcelona, Ella – I see Picasso and I see Paula Rego – and I see an original artist in you!
I love being a godfather, despite the ‘lost’ years — you were such life-affirming baby girl – and now you are a life-affirming young woman – hats off to you too.
Maybe ‘boatman’s tale’ is a poem – I’ll try it out tonight at a poetry open-mic and see how it goes down without a tune and beat.
N

apologies Chris – I’ve just opened pic of ‘maban’ and ‘fruit’ and they are perfect – will set about creating a little blog to celebrate a very happy and productive stop-over

your garden is a little miracle of fine husbandry – hats of to you – if the whole world took your cue there would be no hunger and war
nx

From: Nick Ward
Sent: Sunday, 11 August 2013, 14:08
Subject: Re: thanks – wonderful work, Ella

thanks, Ella – but it’s a song not a poem – big difference! well it’s something I think about quite a bit – Dylan reckoned Ginsberg had it all because he didn’t need music. For me the difference is whether the words arise from some chord changes I’m playing around with as I practice (as they did in ‘boatman’s tale’) or if the words just pop into my had without rhyme or reason. Songs tend to work best if they rhyme – but not always, of course. JJ Cale didn’t bother to rhyme most of his songs because he was so damned cool!I was thinking this morning how portrait artists (which you most definately are) can earn morney without compromising one iota – so all that needs to happen is for subjects (with spare money to invest) to commission and that will give you all the time you need for the philosophy and for painting people you really want to paint! You are good enough to take the fast track.Chris, love the 4th hand and purple thistle – I’ll write a little healing blog around it – also love pics of ‘Maban’ and ‘Fruit’ – right up to the frame! – maybe at some point will need full frame shots for the Nick Ward Catalogue!
Lovely to stay the night – and in the morning I followed the amazingly magical Elizabeth 1’s Path to the river and followed it to down past the Globe. The stranger who took the photo is a Philipino mobile-phone salesman who plays guitar in his spare time. The Thames brings out the best in people – the artists within.
off busking!!
N
The Thames at Batterseathis morning
The boatman’s tale (is underway)
Come what may, come what may, the boatman’s tale is underway
The river is wide and the bank is muddy
The boat feels drunk and I can’t stand steady
Big old storm in the name of love
Rain coming down from high above
Come what may, come what may, the boatman’s tale is underway
Mamas kickin off with new devotions
Water getting higher on all five oceans
Threes a crowd for ritual potions
Sick to death of crazy notions
Come what may, come what may, the boatman’s tale is underway
Something missing in my life
Trouble, trouble, trouble, strife
River flowing through my mind
Bringing out my kinder side
Come what may, come what may, the boatman’s tale is underway
Rivers cruel when wind hits tide
All aboard, enjoy the ride
Inconsequential anchor chain
Breaks assunder in my brain
Come what may, come what may, the boatman’s tale is underway
If we don’t make the other side
You still pay a penny for the ride
17/6/2012
photo(4)
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Ella’s A level submission (2012)
the fracking battle
Did the Head of BBC News make the decision to not mention chemicals in the 6am news item, Evan?If not, who?

Cameron’s decision to put his reputation on the line by supporting fracking was, very disappointingly, given backing by this morning’s BBC Radio 4 ‘Today’ programme when it failed to mention the word ‘chemicals’ (in the 6am news headlines, item 2) suggesting that the process requires only huge quantities of water
—– Forwarded Message —–
From: Nick Ward
To: ‘greenwise’
Sent: Monday, 12 August 2013, 9:35
Subject: Fw: Fracking: A response to your enquiry to DECC – Ref: TO2013/14776
—– Forwarded Message —–
From: Nick Ward id=”yui_3_7_2_1_1376300286180_4028″ style=”font-family:Arial;font-size:small;”>To: “Today.Complaints@bbc.co.uk”
Sent: Monday, 12 August 2013, 9:28
Subject: Fracking: A response to your enquiry to DECC – Ref: TO2013/14776
Cameron’s decision to put his reputation on the line by supporting fracking was, very disappointingly, given backing by this morning’s BBC Radio 4 ‘Today’ programme when it failed to mention the word ‘chemicals’ suggesting that the process requires only huge quantities of water.
As the Governement statement below makes clear, UK ground water will be effected by the use of chemicals, as yet unnamed.
‘The Environment Agency takes a risk-based approach to the regulation of the use of chemicals in shale gas fracking activities and will assess the permitting requirements for each proposal on a site-by-site basis, considering the design of the operations and its proximity to ground and surface waters…’
and
Contamination associated with gas production is generally associated with unsatisfactory cementing of wells, or spills or leakages of chemicals at the surface’.
Over time there will be contamination of ground water – the ‘cementing of wells’ ? This sounds like pure Heath Robinson.
Nick Ward
‘greenwise’
—– Forwarded Message —–
From: Nick Ward
To: Whitehall, Dept Energy and Climate Change
Sent: Thursday, 8 August 2013, 16:59
Subject: Re: A response to your enquiry to DECC – Ref: TO2013/14776
 
Mr Nick Ward
Department of Energy & Climate Change
3 Whitehall Place
London
SW1A 2AW
 
 
 
 
Our ref: TO2013/14776
 
 
8 August 2013
 
 
Dear Mr Ward
Thank you for your email dated 5 August to Michael Fallon, about fracking. I have been asked to reply.
The Government believes that shale gas has the potential to provide the UK with greater energy security, growth and jobs. We are therefore encouraging safe and environmentally sound exploration to determine this potential. The reports from US regulators and review bodies do confirm that gas developments there have, on occasion, led to water contamination. There are relatively few confirmed instances of this – most complaints on investigation have proved to be attributable to causes other than gas production.
Contamination associated with gas production is generally associated with unsatisfactory cementing of wells, or spills or leakages of chemicals at the surface. These confirm the need for the industry to consistently apply good practice; as well as the need for proper scrutiny and oversight of the industry to ensure that this good practice is actually being carried out.Butno case has yet come to light in which it has been confirmed that fracking has contaminated an aquifer.
Here in the UK, we have learnt lessons from the US and elsewhere. We have a strong regulatory system that provides a comprehensive and fit for purpose regime for exploratory activities, but we want to continue to improve it. The UK has over 50 years of experience of regulating the onshore oil and gas industry nationally. There are regulations in place to ensure on-site safety, prevent water contamination, air pollution and mitigate seismic activity.
The Environment Agency takes a risk-based approach to the regulation of the use of chemicals in shale gas fracking activities and will assess the permitting requirements for each proposal on a site-by-site basis, considering the design of the operations and its proximity to ground and surface waters. If information comes to light that suggests there is a risk to groundwater the Environment Agency can serve a prohibition notice on the operator. For the drilling process, the Health and Safety Executive initially scrutinises the well design for safety and then monitors the operations on the well to determine if the operator is conducting operations in accordance with the requirements.
We understand concerns about potential risks to water supplies. The Environment Agency will scrutinise all proposals to ensure that water supplies are properly protected. They have powers to impose conditions to ensure proper protection or to prohibit activities which they consider to pose unacceptable risks. Their permission is also required for any water abstraction, and this will only be given where the proposed quantities are sustainable.
There have also been concerns about non-disclosure of chemicals used in frac fluids. The agencies have powers to require full disclosure of chemicals used in fracking in England and Wales. All chemicals an operator proposes to use will be assessed, and will not be permitted if they are considered to be harmful in the relevant circumstances.
Last year, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the Royal Society conducted an independent review of the scientific and engineering evidence on the risks associated with hydraulic fracturing for shale gas. They concluded that the risks can be managed effectively in the UK, provided that operational best practices are implemented and enforced through regulation.
If you have further questions about the environmental impacts of the proposed drilling, including questions about emissions and the protection of water sources, you should contact the Environment Agency who is responsible for regulating water and environmental matters. Contact the National Customer Contact Centre on: 03708 506 506 (Mon-Fri, 8am – 6pm) or e-mail: ssdenquires@environment-agency.gov.uk.
If you are interested in further information about unconventional oil and gas drilling, you might like to see some Q&A material available on the Government website available at:
I hope that this is helpful.
Yours sincerely,
Kate Robertshaw
DECC Correspondence Unit

From: “correspondence@decc.gsi.gov.uk”
Sent: Thursday, 8 August 2013, 15:13
Subject: A response to your enquiry to DECC – Ref: TO2013/14776

Dear Mr Ward,
Please find attached our response to your recent enquiry.
RegardsKate Robertshaw
DECC Correspondence Unit

The original of this email was scanned for viruses by the Government Secure Intranet virus scanning service supplied by Vodafone in partnership with Symantec. (CCTM Certificate Number 2009/09/0052.) On leaving the GSi this email was certified virus free.
Communications via the GSi may be automatically logged, monitored and/or recorded for legal purposes.

5/8/2013
PICT0022
Sent: Monday, 5 August 2013, 10:12
Subject: Dear Michael Fallon
You are destroying our green and pleasant land – please cast your mind forward. Yes, I realise that this transition to sustainability is expensive and emotional and that the the US is engaged in trade-war against us; that the future of the motor car is assured via hydrogen technology (jobs for the arms-traders); etc, etc – I know your arguments inside-out – and they provide no future. Wake up and stop flinging these unjustified insults – they will backfire on you.
Best wishes,
Yours sincerely,
Nick Ward
‘greenwise’
A trawl through the Daily Mail
p.8: ‘Saxby Chambllss (Top Republican on the Senate Intelligence Committee): ‘Chatter’ (electronically monitored communications between terrorists suspected of planning and carrying out attacks was ‘very reminiscent of what we saw pre-9/11’.
What did Cambllss see ‘pre-9/11’.
As BBC R4 Today’s second lead story was the discovery of American far-right links with the Boston Marathon bomber.
p.4 Michael Fallon: ‘The beauty of drilling in the Weald (hydraulic fracturing – drilling shafts and forcing huge quantities of water and chemicals at extremely high pressure to ‘retrieve’ (that’s The Daily Mail’s word) natural gas trapped inside) ‘ is that it’s under the commentariat.’
What does Fallon mean by ‘commentariat’?
Result wholesale contamination of the ground water, the aquifers, beneath the Weald.
4/8/2013
Message for Obama. The Civil War in America is a global catastophe and your failure to celebrate the heroic achievements of Manning signals the victory of the war-profiteers – or is something more complex going on?
22 Jun 2013 On Friday evening, the Obama administration announced that it had filed three
charges under seal on June 14 in US District Court in 

http://www.globalresearch.ca/whistleblower-edward-snowden-charged-w.

The New American ‎- 15 hours ago

President Obama’s promise to protect whistleblowers has been scrubbed from the Change.gov website. By Joe Wolverton, II, J.D.

Manning verdicts are ‘dangerous precedent’ – Assange

BBC News-30 Jul 2013

Julian Assange, founder of the anti-secrecy organisation Wikileaks, has said the conviction of US Army Private Bradley Manning on spying .

3/8/2013

Chemical weapons and the United Kingdom

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Chemical weapons were used by the United Kingdom in World War I, and while the use of chemical weapons was suggested by Churchill and others postwar in Mesopotamia and in World War II, it appears that they were not actually used, although some historians disagree. While the UK was a signatory of the Hague Conventions (1899 and 1907) which outlawed the use of poison gas shells, the conventions omitted mention of deployment from cylinders, probably because that had not been considered.

The United Kingdom ratified the Geneva Protocol on 9 April 1930. The UK signed the Chemical Weapons Convention on 13 January 1993 and ratified it on 13 May 1996.

Use in World War I

During the First World War, in retaliation to the use of chlorine by Germany against British troops from April 1915 onwards, British forces deployed chlorine themselves for the first time during the Battle of Loos on 25 September 1915. By the end of the war, poison gas use had become widespread on both sides and by 1918 a quarter of artillery shells were filled with gas and Britain had produced around 25,400 tons of toxic chemicals.

Britain used a range of poison gases, originally chlorine and later phosgene, diphosgene and mustard gas. They also used relatively small amounts of the irritant gases chloromethyl chloroformate, chloropicrin, bromacetone and ethyl iodoacetate. Gases were frequently mixed, for example white star was the name given to a mixture of equal volumes of chlorine and phosgene, the chlorine helping to spread the denser but more toxic phosgene. Despite the technical developments, chemical weapons suffered from diminishing effectiveness as the war progressed because of the protective equipment and training which the use engendered on both sides.

Between the wars

After the war, the Royal Air Force dropped diphenyl chloroarsine, an irritant agent designed to cause uncontrollable coughing, on Bolshevik troops in 1919,[1] and Winston Churchill, secretary of state for war and air, suggested that the RAF use various chemical agents in Iraq in 1920 during a major revolt there; see Alleged British use of chemical weapons in Mesopotamia in 1920. Historians are divided as to whether or not gas was in fact used.[2]

Britain signed and ratified the Geneva Protocol in 1930 which banned the use of toxic gases and bacteria in war, although not the development and production of these weapons, and Britain carried out extensive testing of chemical weapons from the early 1930s onwards. In the Rawalpindi experiments, hundreds of Indian soldiers were exposed to Mustard gas in an attempt to determine the appropriate dosage to use on battlefields. Many of the subjects suffered severe burns from their exposure to the gas.[3]

Proposed use in World War II

Proposed use against German invasion

During World War II the British planned to use mustard gas and phosgene to help repel a German invasion in 1940-1941,[4][5] and had there been an invasion may have also deployed it against German cities.[6] General Brooke, in command of British anti-invasion preparations of World War II said that he “…had every intention of using sprayed mustard gas on the beaches” in an annotation in his diary.[7] The British manufactured Mustard, chlorine, lewisite, phosgene and Paris Green and stored it at airfields and depots for use on the beaches.[6]

Later plans

The mustard gas stockpile was enlarged in 1942-1943 for possible use by Bomber Command against German cities, and in 1944 for possible retaliatory use if German forces used chemical weapons against the D-Day landings.[4]

Winston Churchill issued a memorandum advocating a chemical strike on German cities using poison gas and possibly anthrax. Although the idea was rejected, it has provoked debate.[8] In July 1944, fearing that rocket attacks on London would get even worse and hoping to “shorten the war by a year”,[9] Churchill wrote a secret memorandum asking his military chiefs to “think very seriously over this question of using poison gas.” He said “it is absurd to consider morality on this topic” and that:

I should be prepared to do anything [Churchill’s emphasis] that would hit the enemy in a murderous place. I may certainly have to ask you to support me in using poison gas. We could drench the cities of the Ruhr and many other cities in Germany …, and if we do it, let us do it one hundred per cent.
—Winston Churchill, ‘Most Secret’ PRIME MINISTER’S PERSONAL MINUTE to the Chiefs of Staff, 6 July 1944[9]
2/8/13
Greenstage Free Festival, Plough and Fleece, Horningsea (close to Cambridge/Fen Ditton) – 9-11th August 2013On Saturday 10th12.00 Red Velvet ‘politics, love and death but with great tunes and superb harmonies’3.20 Banjo Nick ‘Woody Guthrie reborn as Poet-Banjo balladeer’Thanks for the quote, Phil – I’ll do my best to live up to it.
Like ·  · Promote · Share

Former head of MI6 threatens to expose secrets of Iraq ‘dodgy dossier’

Telegraph.co.uk-21 Jul 2013
Now the ex-MI6 boss, who is Master at Pembroke College, Cambridge University, has said: “What I have written (am writing) is a record of …
  1. Hundreds of fish floating dead on Cambridge river – Cambridge news

    www.cambridge-news.co.uk/Cambridge/Hundreds-of-fish-floating-dead-…

    5 days ago – Hundreds of fish floating dead on Cambridge river  of fish have died because of suspected high ammonia levels in a section of the River Cam.

  2. River users told to stay away from Cam stretch  – Cambridge news

    www.cambridge-news.co.uk/…/River-users-told-to-stay-away-from-Cam

    1 day ago – Cambridge News RSS News Feed · Cambridge News on Facebook  of the River Cam this week following the death of hundreds of fish.

15/7/13
Quote on ‘play’ as ‘peace’ from Harold C. Goddard’s The Meaning of Shakespeare Vol 1 (1951), Chapter XVI: Henry IV, page 183.
Is there any activity of man that involves factors that we find present in () Falstaff: complete freedom, an all-consuming zest for life, an utter subjugation of facts to imagination, and an entire absence of moral responsibility? Obviously there is. That activity is play. Except for that little item of moral responsibility, ‘play’ expresses as nearly as one word can the highest conception of life we are capable of forming: life for its own sake, life as it looks in the morning to a boy
no more behind
But such a day to-morrow as to-day
And to be boy eternal
(…)
‘Play says what the word ‘peace’ tries to say and doesn’t. ‘Play’ brings down to the level of evryone’s understanding what ‘imagination’ conveys to more sophisticated minds. For the element of imagination is indispensible to true play. (…) The one who is playing is the child of five, all alone, pretending that a dirty doll is the rich mother of a dozen infants – invisible to the naked eye. Even boys (sic) playing war, if they are harmonious and happy, are conducting an experiment in peace. Play is the erection of an illusion into a reality. It is not escape from life. It is the realisation of life in something like its fullness. What it is an escape from is the boredom and friction of existence. Like poetry, to which it is the prelude, it stands for a converting or winning-over of facts on a basis of friendship, the dissolving of them in a spirit of love, in contrast to science (at least the science of our day), which, somewhat illogically, stands first for the recognition of the absolute authority of facts and then for their impressment and subjugation to human demands by a kind of military conquest.
6/7/13
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Hugh Chapman took this photo in the garden at CB1 cafe on Mill Road, day after the Cambridge Art Salon show
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4/7/13 – rehearsing with Red Velvet for Cambridge Folk Festival debut

Attention Sir Steve Redgrave

From Nick Ward via email

Sent: Tuesday, 2 July 2013, 11:18
Subject: Fw: the question of money
Sent: Tuesday, 2 July 2013, 11:15
Subject: the question of money
Wendy
Notes.
How to make this use of Hammersmith GB Boathouse work financially?
The marathon sculling squad (via sponsors/benefactors) pay nominal fee per outing and for use of technical facilities (including print and video archive)? Up to a point.
I sell art.
Also prepared to offer West Australian Sculling Academy-style sculling-boat management tuition; and to organise seminars.
I understand, I trust that is also understood by today’s email recipients, that ‘non-processional marathon sculling challenge races on natural waterways’ is antithetical to 2000m lane-racing. While I believe that occasional ‘four-stroke cycle’ sessions might benefit 2000m Olympic level aspirants, it will be a dedicated 50km (roughly) single scullers, male and female, squad, capable of beating the world that I will be looking to develop.
In other words this is an opportunity to campaign for  ‘Tour des Frances’ of single sculling in boats unrestricted by current 2000m limitations.
That means Research and Development.
Nick
corrected 15.02 on 2/7/2013
Sent: Tuesday, 2 July 2013, 8:57
Subject: 5am
Dear Wendy
One of the reasons I needed to investigate sport is that there is only one winner – subjectivity doesn’t come in to it. I can be a tough and uncompromising coach. 5am means 5.15am!
Best wishes
yours sincerely
Nick Ward

Sent: Tuesday, 2 July 2013, 8:50
Subject: Fw: JH: ‘Why the luvvies love it when something goes wrong on stage’…
To ‘Complaints, BBC Radio 4 ‘Today’
 
Sent: Tuesday, 2 July 2013, 8:47
Subject: JH: ‘Why the luvvies love it when something goes wrong on stage’…
I loath the expression ‘luvvies’ John for a multidude of reasons. No wonder Peter Brook left, Glenda.
That was item 3 on this morning’s 6am ‘Today; show.
Item 1: Egypt.
Item 2: Snowden.
quote of the day:
Caliban (Tempest II,2): 
I’ll show thee the best springs:
I’ll pick thee berries:
I’ll fish for thee; and get thee wood enough (…)
I prithee let me bring thee where crabs grow;
And I with my long nails will dig thee pig-nuts;
Show thee a jay’s nest, and instruct thee
To clustering filberts,
And sometime I’ll get thee
Young scamels from the rock:
Wilt thou go with me?
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Re. Proposed GB Marathon Sculling Squad, Hammersmith
will require rigging assistance: who is the GB Head Boatman?
—– Forwarded Message —–
From: Nick Ward
Sent: Sunday, 30 June 2013, 17:50
Subject: proposed GB marathon sculling squad, Hammersith
—– Forwarded Message —–
From: Nick Ward
Sent: Sunday, 30 June 2013, 15:08
Subject: marathon sculling squad
I was very pleased to hear from GB Rowing via Kirsten Lavers with regard to mention made to my ‘four-stroke cycle’ marathon sculling gearing system aimed to maximise recovery between the very big, very powerful, long max power strokes which occur one in four with guiding mantra if it helps.
Hammersith is the ideal base. How many GB rowing-owned singles are racked at the Lower Mall HQ? Weight distribution?
2-3 sessions per week, finished by 9am.
Nick Ward
marathon sculling coach
addendum
 Forwarded Message —–

Sent: Monday, 1 April 2013, 19:45
Subject: Re: Boatrace
good analysis
Daniel

‘Thames future’ | Nick Ward Scenarios

nickwardscenarios.wordpress.com/2011/04/01/becoming-the-fool/

Apr 1, 2011 – N Ward photo by H Ward (2009). Marathon Sculling Log 2 « Nick Ward Scenarios (if you wish to jump to the technical stuff). I also attach the 

Black Swan on the Cam, ‘Wheel’ – Nick Ward Scenarios

nickwardscenarios.wordpress.com/2011/01/26/black-swan-on-the-cam/

Posted by: nickwardscenarios | January 26, 2011 …. By: Marathon Sculling Log 5 (for Lord Coe) « Nick Ward Scenarios on February 15, 2011 at 2:36 pm 

—– Forwarded Message —–
From: Nick Ward>
Sunday, 30 June 2013, 14:52
Subject: Obama: shoulder to ‘soldier'(?)
what kind of slip is this?

slough 2 – Oxford Dictionaries

oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/slough–2

1 [ with object ] (usually slough something off) shed or remove (a layer of dead skin):a snake sloughs off its old skin exfoliate once a week to slough off

meanwhile I’m well-occupied with my
Elizabeth 1 (from various sources), entertaining cards.
E1 (30/6/13 – The Fresh Start): At any cost these plays will be protected from proof of my authority. Let them suspect. ‘Slough off (slew off) all attatchements’.
—– Forwarded Message —–
From:
Sent: Wednesday, 26 June 2013, 13:45
Subject: ‘greenwise’
Dear Glenda
If you would prefer not to be included in this green cross-party pressure group to which I email occasionally please let me know.
Best wishes
Yours soncerely
Nick Ward
George Devine Award 1988
glenda_jackson_gallery_4

Responses

  1. […] scrapbook diary 30/6/13 – […]


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